Marcia,
I would be very surprised indeed if the precise text of the law to which you are referring still exists anywhere - though the general nature of what it provided is well-known. It would, of course, be in Latin. I have extensively searched the web for its text - either in English or in Latin - but have been totally unsuccessful. There are, however, numerous references to the general nature of what the law provided. The 2004 version of Encyclopaedia Britannica has the following to say:-


The allies in central and southern Italy had fought side by side with Rome in several wars and had grown restive under Roman autocratic rule, wanting instead Roman citizenship and the privileges it conferred. In 91 BC the Roman tribune Marcus Livius Drusus tried to solve the problem by proposing legislation that would have admitted all Italians to citizenship, but his program aroused heated opposition in the Senate, and Drusus was soon afterward assassinated. The frustrated Italian allies then rose in revolt.

The peoples of the hills of central Italy formed the heart of the uprising, the Marsi in the north and the Samnites in the south. Neither the Latin colonies nor Etruria and Umbria joined in. The Italians began organizing their own confederacy; they established their headquarters at Corfinium, which they renamed Italia, created a Senate and officers, and issued a special coinage; soon they had 100,000 men in the field. In 90 BC Roman armies were defeated in the northern sector, while in the south the Italians were equally successful and burst into southern Campania. Only by political concession could Rome hope to check the revolt: the consul Lucius Julius Caesar thus helped pass a law granting Roman citizenship to all Italians who had not participated in the revolt and probably also to all who had but were ready to immediately lay down their arms. This move pacified many of the Italians, who soon lost interest in further struggle against Rome. Roman forces under Gnaeus Pompeius Strabo in the north and Lucius Cornelius Sulla in the south soon inflicted decisive defeats on the remaining rebels and captured their strongholds.

The back of the revolt was now broken, although some resistance continued among the Samnites for a short time. Further legislation was soon passed that reinforced the allies' newly won rights; one law regulated the municipal organization of the communities that now entered the Roman state; and another dealt with Cisalpine Gaul (probably granting citizenship to all Latin colonies). Thus, the political unification of all Italy south of the Po River was achieved, and Romans and Italians, hitherto linked by alliance, could now become a single nation.


Note the use of the word "probably" in the second paragraph. 

This suggests to me that the actual original text of the 90 BC law is no longer available.


Ron Huttner LL.B. (Hons)
Barrister, Solicitor, Law Lecturer and Legal Researcher
Melbourne
Australia



On 03/06/2006, at 6:11 AM, Márcia wrote:

Dear coleagues,
 
I have a great need for one law and I would be very grateful if somebody could provide me with it:
 
"Lex Iulia", from 90 BC, it offered citizenship to all Italians who had not raised arms against Rome (From Wikipedia).
 
Thank you very much in advance.
 
Marcia Mazo
Law Librarian
Federal Judicial Council - Brazil
 
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